I am an assistant professor of linguistics at Cornell University. I am very interested in the incremental representations that humans use to process language. My work probes human linguistic processing directly with psycholinguistic experimentation or by analyzing corpora of human behavior (e.g., reading times) or neuroimaging data (e.g., fMRI, M/EEG, etc). Lately, I have been studying the linguistic representations of neural networks in order to find the types of linguistic representations that work well for language processing, and which therefore could be used by humans.

Outside of work, I enjoy travel, dinner parties, and gardening.

I manage the Computational Psycholinguistics Discussions research group (C.Psyd; Seaside).

Recent News

May 13: Gave an invited talk to CPL Lab at MIT: Language is not Language Processing

April 30: Forrest Davis’ paper was accepted to CogSci! Explores the ability to learn situation knowledge and discourse representations from plain text.

April 4: Forrest Davis’ paper was accepted to ACL! Explores aspects of language comprehension that cannot be learned by current language models.

March 19: Forrest Davis’ CUNY presentation went well. Explores the ability to learn situation knowledge and discourse representations from plain text.

December 13: Our Neuropsychologia paper was finally accepted. Shows that linguistic prediction (lexical and syntactic) happens entirely in language-specific brain regions, rather than being driven by domain-general prediction mechanisms.